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National MS Society

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eNews June 2011 - National MS Society
New study questions risk of stress

Data from Nurses’ Health Study published

A new study published in the May 31, 2011, issue of Neurology looked at stress as a possible risk factor for developing MS, focusing on two large groups in the Nurses’ Health Study, which has involved hundreds of thousands of female nurses followed over time. The nurses were asked to report on general stress at home and at work among a number of other factors.

Read about the study’s conclusions

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Meet Laurie Clements Lambeth

MS triggered creativity for Laurie Clements Lambeth
 
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Get real answers to the questions you have about living with MS in your 20s and 30s.
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Sign up now for quality of life webcastSign up now for our quality of life webcast 

On June 22, 2011, join a panel of experts for the live webcast, “Working Toward Your Best Life: Advances in Quality of Life Research." Discover how complementary therapies can enhance traditional pharmacological approaches to manage MS symptoms. Topics will include: improving quality of life, enhancing wellness through complementary therapies, managing fatigue, taming stress and combating emotional and cognitive challenges.

Register now

 

Society-funded research finds low vitamin D in African Americans Research finds low vitamin D in African-Americans with MS

A new study shows that African-Americans with MS have significantly lower levels of vitamin D than those who do not have MS, although these levels were not linked to disease severity. The study, which was funded through awards given by the National MS Society in collaboration with the American Academy of Neurologists, was published in a recent issue of Neurology. (Photo: Alexis Barbee, diagnosed 2009)

Read more

 

More MS News

June 2: Researchers pinpoint novel gene/environment interaction in cells from people with MS

May 31: People with MS caught in Medicare “donut hole” find relief under Affordable Care Act   

Read more about these and other recent reports

This communication is partially sponsored through the generous support of Biogen Idec;
EMD Serono and Pfizer, Inc; Novartis Pharmaceuticals Corporation; and Teva Neuroscience, Inc.
 

MS Active Source  MS LifeLinesNovartis Teva Neuroscience

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Early and ongoing treatment with an FDA-approved therapy can make a difference for people with multiple sclerosis. Learn about your options by talking to your health care professional and contacting the National MS Society at http://www.nationalmssociety.org/ or 1-800-344-4867.

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